The Viking Explorer Who Beat Columbus to America

The Viking Explorer Who Beat Columbus to America
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The Viking Explorer Who Beat Columbus to America:

Nearly 500 years before the birth of Christopher Columbus, a band of European sailor left their homeland behind in search of a new world. Their high-prowed Viking ships sliced through the cobalt waters of the Atlantic Ocean as winds billowed the boat’s enormous single sail.

After traversing unfamiliar waters, the Norsemen aboard the wooden ships spied a new land, dropped anchor and went ashore.

Half a millennium before Columbus “discovered” America, those Viking feet may have been the 1st European ones to ever have touched North American soil.

Exploration was a family business for the expedition’s leader, Leif Eriksson (variations of his last name include Erickson, Ericson, Erikson, Ericsson, and Eiriksson).

His father, Erik the Red, founded the 1st European settlement of Greenland after being expelled from Iceland around A.D. 985 for killing a neighbor. (Erik the Red’s father, himself, had been banished from Norway for committing manslaughter.) Eriksson, who is believed to have been conceived in Iceland around A.D. 970, spent his formative years in desolate Greenland.

Around A.D. 1000, Eriksson sailed east to his ancestral homeland of Norway. There, King Olaf, I Tryggvason converted him to Christianity and charged him with proselytizing the religion to the pagan settlers of Greenland.

Eriksson converted his mother, who built Greenland’s first Christian church, however not his outlaw father.

Icelandic legends called sagas recounted Eriksson’s exploits in the New World around A.D. 1000.

These Norse stories were spread by word of mouth before becoming recorded in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Two sagas give differing accounts as to how Eriksson arrived in North America.

According to the “Saga of Erik the Red,” Eriksson crossed the Atlantic by accident after sailing off course on his return voyage from Norway after his conversion to Christianity.

The “Saga of the Greenlanders,” however, recounts that Eriksson’s voyage to North America was no fluke. Rather, the Viking explorer had heard of a strange land to the west from Icelandic trader Bjarni Herjolfsson, who more than a decade earlier had overshot Greenland and sailed by the shores of North America without setting foot upon it.

Eriksson bought the trader’s ship, raised a crew of 35 men and retraced the route in reverse.

After crossing the Atlantic, the Vikings encountered a rocky, barren land in present-day Canada. Eriksson bestowed upon the land a name as boring as the surrounding—Helluland, Norwegian for “Stone Slab Land.”

Analysts believe this location could possibly have been Baffin Island. The Norsemen then voyaged south to a timber-rich location they called Markland (Forestland), most likely in present day Labrador, before finally setting up a base camp likely on the northern tip of the island of New foundland.

The Vikings spent an entire winter there and benefitted from the milder weather compared to their homeland.

They explored the surrounding region abounding with lush meadows, rivers teeming with salmon, and wild grapes so suitable for a wine that Eriksson called the area as Vinland (Wineland).

After spending the winter in Vinland, Eriksson and his crew sailed home to windswept Greenland with badly needed timbers and plentiful portions of grapes.

Eriksson, who would succeed Erik the Red as chief of the Greenland settlement after his fathers death, never returned to North America, but other Viking continued to sail west to Vinland for at least the ensuing decade.

In spite of North Americas more bountiful resources, the Vikings settlers remained in desolate Greenland. This was perhaps due to the violent encounters—including the slaying of Erikssons brother Thorwald–they had with the indigenous population of North America.

Archaeologists have Excavated the evidence that supports the sagas’ stories of the Norse expeditions to America. In 1960, Norwegian explorer Helge Ingstad scoured the coasts of Labrador and Newfoundland for signs of a possible settlement, and he found it on the northernmost tip of New foundland at L’Anse aux Meadows.

An international team of archaeologists that included Ingstad’s wife, Anne, excavated artifacts of Viking origin dating from around A.D. 1000, and the remain of the Norse village is now part of a UNESCO World Heritage site.

While Columbus is honored with a federal holiday, the man considered to be the leader of the 1st European expedition to North America has not been totally forgotten on the calendar.

In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed a proclamation that declared October 9 to be Leif Eriksson Day in honor of the Vikings explorer, his crew and the country’s Nordic-American heritage.

The proximity of the days honoring Eriksson and Columbus is a coincidence. October 9 was chosen because it is the anniversary of the 1825 arrival in New York of the ship Restauration, which carried the 1st organized band of Norwegian immigrants to the United States.

 

Archaeologists found evidence of stones blackened by iron ore processing (pictured), something that the indigenous North American population were not thought to do. It suggests the buildings that stood at the site were inhabited by Vikings, who made extensive use of iron

Archaeologists found evidence of stones blackened by iron ore processing (pictured), something that the indigenous North American population were not thought to do. It suggests the buildings that stood at the site were inhabited by Vikings, who made extensive use of iron

The researchers discovered the site by looking for unusual patterns in satellite images that indicated the remains of man-made structures in Newfoundland

The researchers discovered the site by looking for unusual patterns in satellite images that indicated the remains of man-made structures in Newfoundland

Christopher Columbus is widely credited with having 'discovered' the New World in his 1492 expedition (depicted in the painting pictured), but a growing amount of evidence suggest that the Vikings beat him to North America by several hundred years


Christopher Columbus is widely credited with having ‘discovered’ the New World in his 1492 expedition (depicted in the painting pictured), but a growing amount of evidence suggest that the Vikings beat him to North America by several hundred years


Researchers found pieces of slag (pictured) in a hearth that they believe was used to roast iron ore prior to smelting it in a furnace at the site in Newfoundland, which suggests it was inhabited by Vikings

Researchers found pieces of slag (pictured) in a hearth that they believe was used to roast iron ore prior to smelting it in a furnace at the site in Newfoundland, which suggests it was inhabited by Vikings

The remains of a Viking ship burial unearthed in Estonia also features in the BBC documentary (Dan Snow with some of the weapons and artefacts found there are pictured)

The remains of a Viking ship burial unearthed in Estonia also features in the BBC documentary (Dan Snow with some of the weapons and artefacts found there are pictured)


Source: dailymail.co.uk


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Jessica Saraceni has been a part of Histecho Since 2018, drawn to the site for its quirky character and through Articles about the Mysteries of earth and human behavior. previously, she was an assistant editor and Research fellow at Archaeology magazine, where she gained an appreciation for the field work. A master's degree in biogeochemistry and environmental science from the Center for Archaeological Research, the University of Texas at San Antonio. She enjoys all forms of exercise; reading works by her favorite author, Haruki Murakami; and playing with her sons.