Grisly Child Sacrifice Found at Foot of Ancient Aztec Temple

Grisly Child Sacrifice Found at Foot of Ancient Aztec Temple

Spread the love

Grisly Child Sacrifice Found at Foot of Ancient Aztec Temple

At the foot of an ancient Aztec temple in Mexico, archaeologists have found the bones of a child sacrifice victim.

The bones were discovered in Tenochtitlan, now the centre of the Mexican capital, Mexico City, the remains adorned with body jewellery.

Archaeologists unearthed the remains of the young child, believed to have been sacrificed in the late fifteenth century, at the foot of an ancient temple in Mexico, in the ancient Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, which is now the center of the Mexican capital, Mexico City

The bones, identified as “Offering 176,” belong to the young boy suspected to have been slaughtered for the Mexican God of war Huitzilopochtli.

It’s understood he was sacrificed in the late 15th century and comes 12 years after the location of the first child sacrifice site at the archaeological site.

The young child was believed to have been sacrificed in the late 15th century. The body of the child sacrifice was found hidden beneath stone slabs

Symbols characteristic of Huitzilopochtli were also found next to the skeleton, which was found under the floor of a square to the west of the Templo Mayor.

The archaeologists said that in order to offer the remains of the child, the Aztecs had to raise a series of stone slabs from the floor and dig a pit in the ground.

The Aztecs built a cylindrical box in which the child was placed with volcanic rocks, stuck together with stucco. This image shows the remains that were excavated

They then had to build the cylindrical box in which the child was placed with volcanic stones, stuck together with stucco.

One expert told reporters: “Then they filled the square with soil brought from the banks of the old lake to build another square on top of it.”

The discovery comes after hundreds of skulls were recently found in Tenochtitlan believed to have been placed on public display in ritual sacrifices.

A stone Tzompantli (skull rack) found during the excavations of Templo Mayor (Great Temple) in Tenochtitlan. New research has found the ‘skull towers’ which used real human heads were just a small part of a massive display of skulls known as Huey Tzompantli

Tenochtitlan was built on an island in what was then Lake Texcoco in the Valley of Mexico.

The city was the capital of the expanding Aztec Empire in the 15th century until it was captured by the Spanish in 1521.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the Pre-Columbian Americas.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
P. Natasha Covers Classical Archaeology news and has been with Histecho since 2017. She has a Master's degree in MA Archaeology from New York University's Science, Health and Environmental Reporting program. A California native, she also holds a Bachelor of science in molecular biology and a Master of Science in biology from the University of California, San Diego.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *