California Governor Gavin Newsom Issues Formal Apology For State’s Role In Native American Genocide

California Governor Gavin Newsom Issues Formal Apology For State’s Role In Native American Genocide
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California Governor Gavin Newsom Issues Formal Apology For State’s Role In Native American Genocide

Governor Gavin Newsom has codified a public apology on behalf of all Californians to Native peoples for the atrocities of the 1800s.
Governor Gavin Newsom has codified a public apology on behalf of all Californians to Native peoples for the atrocities of the 1800s.

The first governor of California, Peter Burnett, advised the Legislature in 1851 to expect war “until the Indian race becomes extinct.”

Recounting his state’s dark history, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday issued an apology in front of a group of Native American tribal leaders on behalf of the state for a history of repression and violence.

Mr. Newsom, in an emotional presentation, recited a published chronicle from the 19th century that listed a tally of Indian deaths, including an account of a white settler who chose to kill children with a revolver instead of a high-caliber shotgun because “it tore them up so bad.”

“It’s called genocide, that’s what it was, a genocide,” Newsom said, citing the $1.3 million in state funding authorized in the 1850s to subsidize militia campaigns against Native Americans.

“No other way to describe it, and that’s the way it needs to be described in the history books.”

The Democratic governor, in an executive order, called for the creation of a Truth and Healing Council to produce a report before the end of 2024 on the historical relationship between the state and Native Americans.

Newsom delivered the apology during an appearance with tribal leaders at the California Indian Heritage Center near Sacramento, the state capital.

Tribal leaders who appeared with Newsom on Tuesday thanked him for the apology.

“It’s healing to hear your words, but actions will speak for themselves and I do look forward to hearing more and seeing more of you,” Erica Pinto, chairwoman of Jamul Indian Village in San Diego County, said.

“WAR OF EXTERMINATION”

In discussing the history of California’s treatment of Native Americans, Newsom cited an 1851 address to the state legislature by California’s first governor, Peter Burnett.

“That a war of extermination will continue to be waged between the races until the Indian race becomes extinct must be expected,” Burnett said then.

The state of California had never previously formally apologized for its role in wrongdoing against Native Americans, according to the governor’s office.

Newsom’s predecessor, Democrat Jerry Brown, did endorse a 2016 book by historian Benjamin Madley, of the University of California, Los Angeles, titled “An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873.”

The book detailed how California’s indigenous population fell from as many as 150,000 people to about 30,000.

Madley estimated that between 1846 and 1873, up to 16,000 Native Americans were killed in California. Disease, dislocation, and starvation also took their toll, Madley wrote.

The U.S. Congress in 2009 passed a resolution, tucked into an appropriations bill, that apologized to Native Americans for violence, maltreatment, and neglect inflicted by U.S. citizens.

Before white settlement, around 80 native languages were spoken in what is now California.
Before white settlement, around 80 native languages were spoken in what is now California.

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John Smith has been with Histecho since 2017, A Senior Editor & Writer for Histecho. his work has been featured in outlets such as Scientific American, The Washington Post, NBC News, and Fox News. John grew up outside of Philadelphia and studied biology at Hamilton College in upstate New York.